Throwback Thursday: Chicken with Indian Spices, Mango & Coconut from Simple

Here’s yet another throwback to Simple by Diana Henry. We’ve been making a STACK of the recipes from Made in India over the last couple months (and yet I’ve still only posted about the book once!), but I just had to try this Mango Chicken Curry recipe from Simple because it’s one of my favorite Indian curries.

It was super easy to throw together as all the recipes from this book have been. You cook some chicken thighs in butter and oil then set them aside while you make the sauce – by cooking onions and garlic, adding chopped tomatoes, curry paste, ginger and stock then boiling to reduce the sauce by half. Then you add coconut cream, brown sugar and return the chicken to the pan for another 15 minutes. You add the mango at the last minute so it doesn’t overcook and then finish it with some cream and some lemon or lime juice. We served it with basmati rice and naan and topped it with some fresh coriander.

Sadly, I was disappointed with the end result. The mango flavour was just too muted. It was a really nice curry, but it wasn’t really what I wanted. I’m tempted to try it again since we still have a stack of the Patak’s vindaloo curry paste we bought especially for this recipe and adding extra mango or maybe even some mango nectar in addition to the stock. I’m determined to perfect this favourite meal!

 

 

Throwback Thursday: Sour Cherry Streusel Cake from Classic German Baking

Throwback to June 2017 when Food52 Baking Club was going through Luisa Weiss’s book Classic German Baking. Sooo many delicious looking desserts that just had to be baked ASAP.

Her Sour Cherry Streusel Cake or Kirschstreuselkuchen very quickly became one of my favourite recipes and I’ve probably made it half a dozen times over the last 9 months. The recipe can be found online, so there’s no excuse not to try it for yourself. And as long as you keep a jar of tart cherries in your cupboard and have basic baking ingredients on hand, this is a cake you can whip up in a jiffy if you suddenly find yourself in need of a cake.

There’s 3 basic components in this recipe: the streusel, the cherries and the batter. The streusel you mix by hand and is made of flour, sugar, butter, cinnamon and salt. The cherries are really interesting as you drain the juice and bring it to a boil with a bit set aside to create a slurry with some cornflour and then whisked in to make it get thick and syrupy. Then you reincorporate the cherries and set it aside to cool while you make the batter. And the batter is a dead simple basic butter cake – where you cream butter and sugar and some eggs and vanilla then add your dry ingredients and a little milk (I usually use buttermilk). Then you layer it up in a 9×13 inch pan and bake in a moderate oven for 45-50 minutes.

It turns out great every time, and while I’m actually a little disappointed with the lack of color in the streusel this time around, it still tasted fabulous. I used a new type of gluten free flour and it behaved a little differently. This is another thing of interest, how adaptable this recipe is to gluten free. We regularly bake for a gluten free guest and so this is an easy recipe for me to make for her by simply replacing the plain flour with gluten free and everything else remains the same. The cake is not overly sweet making it easy to eat more than one slice and the red color on the cherries is so elegant that it would sit very nicely on a high tea platter.

I’m really surprised this is the first time I’ve posted about this book because it is one of my absolute favorites. I look forward to sharing more from this book soon!

Throwback Thursday: Bacon & Egg Risotto from Simple

This is another throwback from Simple by Diana Henry that fits firmly into that “brinner” category – ie breakfast for dinner. We made this last month when one of our big boys was away on camp as it serves 2 and we simply doubled it so it would feed the remaining 5 of us. It would’ve been tripled had he been here, but given he’s not too fond of eggs I’m not sure he would’ve eaten it.

It’s a basic risotto making process: heat up some stock in a saucepan and in a skillet melt some butter and cook the bacon and onion. Then toast off the arborio rice until it’s translucent and start incorporating the stock a ladle at a time until the liquid absorbs. Season with salt and pepper and add some parsley and parmesan. And serve with poached eggs on top. No wonder it’s in a book called “Simple”. This barely seems like a recipe!

This is a super comforting mid week meal and it’s rather easy to upscale. It is definitely a recipe I’ll return to when we have bacon that needs to be used up!

Throwback Thursday: Golden Brioche Loaves from Baking: From My Home to Yours

It didn’t take me long to return to  Dorie Greenspan’s Baking From My Home to Yours, the book that we went through in the Food52 Baking Club last month. I searched through our Facebook group for brioche because I wanted to make the Mushrooms on Brioche from Simple and thought I should just make it from scratch. What I quickly found out was that Dorie’s recipe was super popular. And now I can see why!

Dorie describes it as “elegant” and it really is that. And again another example of how bread isn’t hard to make – it just takes time and if you’re lucky, you’ll have a good stand mixer that will do the hard labor for you. First, you mix yeast into some water and milk and then add flour and salt and mix to just moisten the flour before adding eggs and sugar. Then you incorporate butter in small chunks and you beat the dough until it pulls away from the sides of the bowl and put it into a greased container at room temperature until it’s nearly doubled. Then you deflate the dough and refrigerate it overnight, deflating again every half hour until it stops rising.

The next day you shape the dough by dividing it in half then each half into four. You shape the smaller portions into 4 logs that you lay crosswise in 2 bread tins and you leave at room temperature until the dough almost fills the pans. Here is where I came unstuck. I used the wrong pan size. And so my brioche doesn’t really have much height. Next time I will definitely use smaller tins.

You brush on an egg wash and bake it in a hot oven for about 30 minutes. And the result: golden and deliciously buttery crumb that takes everything up a notch flavour and comfort wise. I cannot wait to make this again!

Throwback Thursday: Sausage & Apple Pie from Art of the Pie

So because Pi Day was on a Wednesday, I somehow got it in my head that I’d posted about the two pies I made for dinner and dessert when all I’d done was add a picture of my slices for What I Ate Wednesday! Whoops.

Our dinner pie was from Food52 Cookbook Club’s first book Art of the Pie by Kate McDermott. I was immediately intrigued by this as it is a savory pie with fruit in it and it has a cheddar cheese crust. I definitely had to make it!

The cheddar cheese crust was simple to throw together. Since I had to grate the cheese which I always use a food processor for, I ended up making the dough straight in there rather than by hand. Flour, salt, cheddar, butter and ice water thrown in together and once it starts to come together I turned it out onto a floured bit of plastic wrap and split it in two pieces and formed it into a disc and refrigerated it until I was ready to make the pie.

Then I made the filling. First I made up a batch of Kenji Alt-Lopez’s maple sage breakfast sausage which I posted about here. Then I cooked a big tin of pie apple with salt, apple juice, brown sugar, thyme, rosemary and allspice for about 5 minutes and then drained the juices and put the apple mixture in with the sausage. Then I reduced the juice to 1 cup in a saucepan and stirred that through the apple-sausage mixture.

Then it was just a matter of rolling out the dough, putting the filling in, rolling out the lid and crimping them together. Egg wash on and bake for 40 minutes, with two more egg washes at 10 and 20 minutes.

This was so good – we were all so glad to have tried it. And given how interestingly different the pie sounded, I was shocked to find not even a sliver in the pie plate when I came back into the kitchen. I can’t wait to cook more from this book!

Throwback Thursday: Custard Yo-Yos from Sweet

There is something about the sandy buttery texture of these biscuits that takes you to your happy place and if you are looking for the perfect indulgent treat, these most certainly are it.

I’ve been making these yo-yos since December when Food52 Baking Club was going through Ottolenghi & Goh’s baking book, Sweet. I worked out rather quickly that simply replacing the flour with gluten free flour would allow for a lovely gluten free option on the cookie platters I gave out at Christmas, and I made batch after batch of these with the first bunch of rhubarb I’ve ever purchased from the grocery store.

Well rhubarb season is over, so it was time to start experimenting with other fillings as our primary school fete is coming up and I’m looking after the cake stall and think these could be a huge hit if I get them just right. These are my first try with changing the filling, and the only thing I did was replace the rhubarb with strawberries (and I even took the time to roast them for 30 minutes in the oven).

The biscuits themselves are a mixture of gluten free flour, custard powder, pure icing sugar, salt, butter and vanilla which are then rolled into 15g balls and flattened with a fork before baking. They’re sandwiched with the roasted strawberries that have been pureed in a food processor with butter and pure icing sugar and a little lemon juice which give that delightful pink color and a tart fruity contrast to the sugary buttery biscuits.

Really they aren’t all that difficult, but they are delicate and you have to be super careful not to overbake or underbake them. I lost my first tray by overbaking which was a bit sad, but the rest came out perfectly as I adjusted the timing.

My only criticism of the recipe is that the icing is either really soft or really hard, rather than being that perfect in between. They set solid if in the fridge but can become a melty mess if you try to serve them at room temperature. I’m getting to the stage where I think I may give up on their icing recipe and look elsewhere for a solution that will be fete appropriate, as the cake stall is going to be outdoors. I do want to keep the strawberry though, as that seems to make them a bit different to the vanilla or lemon or passionfruit fillings you normally see.

Regardless of that, I love this recipe and have written it out in my recipe book for safe keeping. It’s nice to give the gluten free person in your life something that doesn’t feel like they’re compromising. These make a really sweet gift!

Throwback Thursday: Toasted Brioche with Boozy Mushrooms from Simple

Throwback to April 2017, when the Food52 Cookbook Club was going through Diana Henry’s book Simple. “Effortless food, big flavours” promised on the cover, and wouldn’t you know she delivers! I’d been wanting to try this fancified mushrooms on toast for a while, but given we have a big family and young kids, it’s not all that conducive as a midweek meal, even though I can imagine that when the kids are no longer at home, this is the sort of cooking we’ll do all the time. But one of the big boys is away on camp at the moment, so it seemed much more doable, even though I still had to double the recipe!

The brioche that the mushrooms are sitting on top of is my first attempt at making brioche (I will blog about this next week) and while I used the wrong size pan so it isn’t as tall as I’d like, it was still absolutely delicious and worked perfectly for this dish.

The mushrooms themselves are a 500g packet of sliced button mushrooms and 30g of dried shiitakes that have soaked in boiling water while the fresh mushrooms were cooked in a frypan. Then you add the rehydrated mushrooms in their liquid, cook it off, then add some dry sherry and salt and pepper, and then finish with cream. I seriously didn’t even need a chopping board and knife to make this dish!

I had to go to a workshop at my daughter’s school just as I’d finished cooking dinner, so quickly took a couple bites and saved the rest for after. It wasn’t long after I left that Aaron was texting me “OMG this is so BEAUTIFUL!!!” and he isn’t wrong. This dish is fabulous and I will definitely be making this again!

I do have a few more recipes from this book on my radar to try so I’m sure you’ll be seeing more TBT posts about them in the future.

Throwback Thursday: Rose Hibiscus Shortbread Fans from Dorie’s Cookies

I’ve previously done a Throwback Thursday post for Dorie’s Cookies, the book Food52 Baking Club covered in its very first month. This book is seriously an encyclopedia of every type of cookie you could possibly want to make. And every picture is so beautiful.

We made this recipe when we threw a little afternoon tea for Mother’s Day last year (it’s online here). Everything that we made had some form of pink in it – well the sweets, that is. And the fact that this recipe has tea in it, made it even more appropriate for our special afternoon tea table.

I’ve since come to adapt it as a gluten free cookie. In the side bar, Dorie gives the suggestion that rather than part rice flour part all purpose you can use fully all purpose flour, so I take that amount and replace it with gluten free flour, and it turns out great every time.

I had a hard time finding plain hibiscus tea, so started out with a passionfruit hibiscus blend which was nice, then today I noticed that Dorie suggests Celestial Seasonings Red Zinger tea – and I had Raspberry Zinger tea in my cupboard so I thought I’d give that a whirl. It took almost 2 tea bags, so I sprinkled the rest of the tea leaves over the shortbread along with the sugar sprinkles. A whole new level of deliciousness was achieved. I’m already planning a trip to the markets where I source Celestial Seasonings here to stock up on some more.

I definitely recommend this recipe to anyone who loves tea and shortbread. It really is the perfect cookie. And it’s really quick to put together. You put the tea leaves in with the sugar and smash them about a bit. Then you add the butter and salt and cream the mixture, then the extracts, then the flour. I no longer bake this in a springform cake pan, I free form the circle of dough on a cookie sheet and roll it nice and even. I score the disc into 12 wedges completely, and use the fork prong trick along the edge. I baked this for 20 minutes at 150C and it was done just perfectly. The icing is simply icing sugar and a tablespoon of milk whisked together. Nothing fancy, it doesn’t need it. I’ll be enjoying this over the next few days with my afternoon cuppa.

 

Throwback Thursday: Clementine and Almond Syrup Cake from Jerusalem

I’m now up to 4 – I own 4 out of the 5 Ottolenghi books that the Food52 Cookbook Club included in their June 2017 selections from his repertoire. I talked a bit about that month in this post.

The following is a major cake fail. I burnt this cake to a crisp. No joke. I salvaged it, but it was bad. So I was a bit fancy with the camera angles so you can’t see what a patchwork job it was. I sawed off the top and carefully cut away the sides before brushing the syrup on. Sigh. I’m still not sure where I went wrong with the oven temperature.

I needed a gluten free cake. I’ve dabbled a bit in gluten free baking and I thought that given that a large portion of this cake batter was almond meal, it would probably work with substituting the plain flour for gluten free flour 1:1. It worked a treat! I just had my oven too hot. But anyway…

The Clementine and Almond Syrup cake from Jerusalem is to die for.  The recipe is online, so I implore you to try it! To have had such a massive issue with the baking and to have still ended up with a superbly moist cake is a testament to how beautiful this recipe is. Clementines aren’t in season in Australia at the moment, but I have a fruit drawer full of oranges that need to be used so I just went with that. I used Grand Marnier in the chocolate icing instead of straight Cognac. No big change, but a change nonetheless.

We ended up cancelling our plans so this cake never made it past the test kitchen. We’ve rescheduled for next week though so I’m keen to make it again to see if it’s just as good if I don’t burn it. Aaron called it one of the nicest cakes I’ve made and that is really saying something. I can’t wait for our gluten free friend to try it!

Throwback Thursday: Lemon Sugar Cookies from Dorie’s Cookies

Throwback to the very start of Food52’s Baking Club, April 2017, when we were all baking from Dorie’s Cookies, a compendium of every possible cookie you could imagine, beautifully photographed and equally beautiful tasting. I fell in love with what looks like a Plain Jane cookie but are probably one of my top 3 cookies of all time…Dorie’s lemon sugar cookies.

The recipe can be found on Dorie’s website, so head over there to try them out to see what I’m talking about. They are super simple to put together, if you’re a regular cookie baker and are fairly organized, you can knock them out in about an hour.

It’s basically creamed butter, sugar and lemon zest, add eggs and vanilla, your mixed dried ingredients (flour, bicarb, baking powder, salt) and lemon juice. Dorie says 1-2 lemons…my average Australian lemons that you get from Woolworths (oh to have a lemon tree or a friend with one!) are small so I always need 2, and I make sure to add the zest from both for a bit of extra zing. I set aside 1/2 cup of sugar for dredging and I use my #60 cookie scoop to portion the dough and get 64 cookies every time.

I took a container full of these to a P&C (PTA) meeting this week and watched as they slowly but surely got sampled, then another and another disappeared. They are deceptively delicious!